October 31, 2017 (Halifax, N.S.) – Today, the Centre for Ocean Ventures and Entrepreneurship (COVE) is pleased to open a call for tenants, with the ambition to bring together the best of
ocean tech in one place, at the edge of Halifax Harbour, the 2nd largest natural harbour in the world, and in the centre of Halifax’s emerging innovation district. With spaces and programs to
accommodate both short and long-term requirements, COVE provides companies an environment for innovation, commercialization and growth.

The $20M transformation of the COVE site in Dartmouth is well underway and has been designed to foster the sharing of ideas and expertise among companies of all sizes, from pure
start-ups, to small and medium sized companies, to product development teams of large organizations seeking a collaborative environment to drive breakthrough concepts.

The site is nearly 8 acres with an additional 12 acres of water lots, more than 2800 feet of wharfage with direct access, including deep water access, to the harbour, and exterior laydown and storage area. COVE will offer over 53,000 square feet of space including office, open office, workshop, as well as shared amenity, tools and common spaces.

“COVE is designed to be a collaborative place in which to share resources, foster big thinking and drive innovation, and ultimately business growth, in a thriving centre with unique harbour
access,” comments Jennifer Angel, Acting CEO, Waterfront Development. “It is important economic infrastructure that builds on our strength in ocean technology across multiple, high
potential economic sectors. We are proud to have worked with a committed group of public and private sector partners to bring it to life.”

“COVE is among the most exciting new projects in the ocean technology space, not only in Nova Scotia, but around the world. We have a stellar local talent pool who are already pushing the
boundaries of innovation in their own right,” says Jim Hanlon, CEO, IORE. “Add a world-class facility with practical testing, shops and prototyping facilities, great community spaces, and
world class community development and marketing programs, and we are very, very excited about the future for ocean tech in Nova Scotia.”

COVE is available for occupancy in Spring 2018 and applications are now being accepted. For more information and access to the complete tenant package, please visit coveocean.com.

About COVE

Centre for Ocean Ventures Entrepreneurship is a collaborative facility for applied innovation in the ocean sector. Our mission is to propel the ocean economy by providing high quality marine
infrastructure and a collaborative space in which a community of ocean enterprises can start, grow and prosper. Our primary goal is to support ocean technology commercialization and business
growth. Irving Shipbuilding, as part of its Value Proposition commitments under the National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS), has invested $4.52 million in IORE to support the development of COVE programs and operations.

COVE is a product of partnership in action. The facility and land is owned and managed by Waterfront Development, which also leads planning and development for the facility. The
incubator for start-ups within COVE and the programs to support entrepreneurship are run by Innovacorp. The Institute for Ocean Research Enterprise (IORE), operating under the COVE
name, develops and manages the programs, services, and initiatives for COVE members. COVE benefits greatly from the ecosystem that encourages ocean tech commercialization and
economic growth; from post-secondary institutions like Dalhousie University, and Nova Scotia Community College, to Nova Scotia Business Inc. and government departments and agencies,
COVE is a collaboration for innovation. www.coveocean.com

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To request an interview, additional photos or a tour of the site, please contact:

Kelly Rose
Senior Communications Manager
Waterfront Development
902.222.6297 (c)
kelly.rose@wdcl.ca

Jim Hanlon
Chief Executive Officer
Institute for Ocean Research Enterprise (IORE)
902.266.8227 (c)
Jim.Hanlon@coveocean.com

Leslie Munro
Coordinator for Operations and Communications
Institute for Ocean Research Enterprise (IORE)
902.334.2683 (c)
Leslie.Munro@coveocean.com

Dr. Sheryl Scully and Anna Naylor completed their second Student Intentions and Perceptions Study of First Nations Youth in Nova Scotia.  Mirroring the pilot regional study, this study focuses exclusively on the responses of First Nations youth in our province, in grades 6-12.  This study provides insights into the perceptions and intentions of First Nations youth regarding careers in our province – specifically relating to oceans and skilled trades.  The study also examines mobility intentions (inter-provincial and out-of-community) of MK youth.

The report can be found here:

Report of Findings to Key Stakeholders – MK Study August 2017

OUR OCEAN PLAYGROUND – Education Day 2016

GRADE 7–8 TEACHER DEVELOPMENT DAY: EXPERIENTIAL OCEAN EDUCATION

Wednesday, November 23, 2016 | Halifax World Trade and Convention Centre 1800 Argyle Street, Halifax Nova Scotia

Be part of an exciting event focusing on experiential ocean education. You will have a chance to participate in interactive investigations relating to 4 key ocean sectors in our province, led by regional experts from industry and academia. Participate in hands-on experiences that will link science, technology, engineering and math, with concepts relating to the ocean economy and ecology, careers, innovation & entrepreneurship, and local communities.

Aquaculture

All types of farming rely on a good understanding of lifecycles and ecosystems. Learn more about the controlled farming of freshwater and marine fish and aquatic plants, and gain insight into how this growing industry is contributing to the economy of small coastal communities across our region. (French/English)

Marine Renewable Energy

All movement is energy. Find out how energy is being harnessed from tides, waves and currents. Meet local innovators who are on the cutting edge of this technology, and build efficient turbines that best balance the need to capture energy with the interests of preserving aquatic ecosystems. (English)

Marine Optics and Acoustics

Explore how sight & sound and the behaviour of light and sound waves behave and vary in marine environments. Understand how local researchers and innovators use this science to develop technologies that help us to see and hear throughout the ocean – and see how this information helps to inform activities relating to ecology, the economy, and global societies. (English)

Shipbuilding and Boat Building

Investigate how the properties of materials and ocean water influence the design and construction of marine vessels. Explore cutting-edge technologies and careers that are emerging from these booming sectors, and discuss the impact on communities and the economy across the province. (French/English)

OUR OCEAN PLAYGROUND – Education Day 2016

GRADE 7–8 TEACHER DEVELOPMENT DAY: EXPERIENTIAL OCEAN EDUCATION

Wednesday, November 23, 2016 | Halifax World Trade and Convention Centre 1800 Argyle Street, Halifax Nova Scotia

Be part of an exciting event focusing on experiential ocean education. You will have a chance to participate in interactive investigations relating to 4 key ocean sectors in our province, led by regional experts from industry and academia. Participate in hands-on experiences that will link science, technology, engineering and math, with concepts relating to the ocean economy and ecology, careers, innovation & entrepreneurship, and local communities.

Aquaculture

All types of farming rely on a good understanding of lifecycles and ecosystems. Learn more about the controlled farming of freshwater and marine fish and aquatic plants, and gain insight into how this growing industry is contributing to the economy of small coastal communities across our region. (French/English)

Marine Renewable Energy

All movement is energy. Find out how energy is being harnessed from tides, waves and currents. Meet local innovators who are on the cutting edge of this technology, and build efficient turbines that best balance the need to capture energy with the interests of preserving aquatic ecosystems. (English)

Marine Optics and Acoustics

Explore how sight & sound and the behaviour of light and sound waves behave and vary in marine environments. Understand how local researchers and innovators use this science to develop technologies that help us to see and hear throughout the ocean – and see how this information helps to inform activities relating to ecology, the economy, and global societies. (English)

Shipbuilding and Boat Building

Investigate how the properties of materials and ocean water influence the design and construction of marine vessels. Explore cutting-edge technologies and careers that are emerging from these booming sectors, and discuss the impact on communities and the economy across the province. (French/English)

A new research study from the Institute for Ocean Research Enterprise (IORE) and the StFX Faculty of Education is looking to shed light on the career perceptions and intentions of Nova Scotia junior high school students, including perceptions on several emerging regional sectors.

Dr. Sherry Scully, IORE’s Director of Learning and Organizational Development, and StFX education professor Dr. Katarin MacLeod received a $15,000 Mitacs Accelerate grant to employ StFX education PhD student Laura Stiles-Clarke to analyze and recap results from a survey conducted with Grades 6-9 students across Nova Scotia.
The grant comes under the Mitacs Accelerate Program, which connects graduate students and postdoctoral fellows with companies through short-term research projects. Mitacs is a national not-for-profit organization that facilitates collaboration between academia and industry, government and other organizations.
“It’s been a wonderful partnership, and in some ways a model, in that academia and industry can work together to accomplish something for the good of the entire province,” Dr. MacLeod says.
Having both academia and industry work together on the research lends an added layer to the results, adds Dr. Scully, who brought the idea of a partnership to StFX.
Dr. Scully says the idea for the project was born out of earlier research she had completed, and a desire to look further into career literacy, to explore what young people are thinking about in terms of general career interests, and specifically about careers in the region and in the marine industry and skilled trades.
The researchers wanted to survey younger students still enrolled in general science courses to gain insight into when and how career perceptions are formed, she says.
Drs. Scully and MacLeod worked together to launch the pilot study, and working with the StFX Research Grants Office, put together the proposal for Mitacs.
“StFX has been endeavouring to expand its working relationship with Mitacs. This Accelerate Award is an excellent opportunity for one of our doctoral students in education to gain valuable applied experience in the industry and government sectors. We are also delighted to partner with the Institute for Ocean Research Enterprise on this cutting-edge study of young science students’ perceptions of career opportunities in Nova Scotia,” says John Blackwell, Director of StFX’s Research Grants Office.
In January, in partnership with the Nova Scotia Department of Education and Early Childhood, the researchers launched the Student Intentions and Perceptions survey in all English, French, and Mi’kmaq school boards across the province. The survey received almost 14,500 responses, nearly a 40 per cent response rate.
Dr. Scully says results could provide insights into the perceptions of careers in trades and technology, engineering, ocean sciences and marine careers, and the factors that influence these perceptions as well as key times for career counselling and awareness and exposure programs.
Ms. Stiles-Clarke says it’s been a wonderful opportunity for her to work on this research.
“It’s brought a whole other dimension to my learning,” she says, noting the networking and learning opportunities created.
“It’s been hugely valuable for me to develop my research skills. It also opened up new knowledge that wouldn’t have happened without the grant,” she says.
The project has produced several reports, including an industry report that has been presented to the Nova Scotia Department of Education. Dr. MacLeod says they believe the project has the potential for multiple journal articles as well as conference presentations and a later follow-up study.